Government News Analysis

Fallout from the mines

Loose canon, Environment and Natural Resources Secretary, Gina Lopez (photo), who blasted the Philippines mining sector last week with enough shot to knock out most of the pit props that support it – with her unilateral declaration to close down 56% of the country’s mines – has been temporarily restrained as the damage from her decision continues to linger.

Thankfully, the President Rodrigo Duterte and the Cabinet moved quickly to calm fears and put a block on the order. They want to hear from the other side and take a closer look at the findings on which her conclusions are based.

Malacañang Palace issued the following statement: “Members of the Cabinet have expressed their full support behind President Duterte’s decision to observe due process before implementing a directive of the Department of the Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) to shut down or suspend 28 mining sites across the country”.

It pointed out that the DENR’s move “has triggered outrage in communities hosting mining sites, as some 195,000 direct and indirect workers and their families, or a total of some 1.2 million people, would be adversely affected by the closure and suspensions of the mine sites”.

Meanwhile, the Department of Finance, which had led the Cabinet challenge to Lopez’s order, issued the following statement. “Malacañang has swiftly moved to calm fears of massive layoffs in communities affected by Lopez’s sudden move to close down or suspend mining operations in 10 provinces across the country, after several Cabinet officials expressed concern over the detrimental impact of her decision, which she had apparently kept to herself and even excluded members of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) team that conducted the audit, as well as the panel that reviewed the audit findings”.

All this will reduce the inflammation around the wound, but the problem is some damage has already been done.

The fallout has not just hit the mining companies en bloc through the suspension of their operations. Those among them that are publically listed on the Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE) have seen their stock prices plunge and their shareholders – mostly Filipino individuals – have lost what for many would have been their savings. The PSE is predominantly traded by retail investors; they account for more than 95% of total trades. And so the little guy, whom Lopez claims to be looking out for, loses again.

This was the immediate result of Lopez’s much-publicised seven-month-long nationwide audit of Philippine mines – her flagship policy that seems to have been rooted in some form of hippie economics and an emotional and zealous mission to rid the country of miners.

The eco-warrior princess – Regina Paz L. López (now plain Gina Lopez) whose siblings run the family’s media, telecoms, power, energy, real-estate, infrastructure and manufacturing interests through the vast Lopez Group, who hit the ashram circuit in her late teens and became a yoga missionary – was saving the planet for her grandchildren’s grandchildren and striking a blow against big business and its brutal rape of the Philippine countryside. Secretary Lopez was “healing the hurt”. That’s how she sold it, and it’s easy to see why she was cheered on by her organically grown fans.

However, in making her announcement, she had failed first to directly inform the gazetted companies that the mining bans were now in effect. No formal notice was issued by the DENR. Consequently, mine owners and operators didn’t know whether they’d been closed or suspended or in fact anything else about Lopez’s decree. And up until yesterday – a full 10 days after the announcement – the Chamber of Mines of the Philippines says its members still haven’t received any order from the DENR.

They weren’t the only ones baffled, however. The PSE was also left in the dark. As global nickel prices shot north by around 8% – and prices for mining stocks on the exchange fled sharply in the opposite direction – they couldn’t cross-check with the mining companies listed on the bourse to decide whether to suspend trading or continue. In the end, the listed mining firms asked the PSE for a voluntary halt to trading in their shares; but of course by then the horse had already bolted.

But Lopez’s announcement was beyond irregular; it was grossly irresponsible. This was restricted government information which Lopez made available to members of the public even before the mining companies had been officially informed. In other words, this could have been used as insider information and could have been acted on – and for all we know it was – to make a quick killing; loading up on borrowed stock and shorting it, for example. Holders of mining stock could also have been alerted, allowing them to offload before the price dropped further. As a friend pointed out, “if a government official did that in Hong Kong, he’d be hanged, drawn and quartered”.

Also, because of the way the PSE operates, the Philippine regulator isn’t able to determine whether there’ve been short sells – they can’t capture them. Also, while on other bourses short selling can only take place on an uptick in the share price, on the PSE, because there’s no way of knowing if they took place, it seems they can happen on a down tick. That said, we’re sure that the Securities and Exchange Commission will be looking for trading irregularities concerning mining shares around the time of the announcement.

The point in all this is that anything put out by the government – or in this case, one of its ministers – can have a direct impact on the trading value of shares. That’s something that governments everywhere – banana republics excluded – take pains to avoid. It leaves them open to all sorts of charges, from naïveté (which we’d like to believe is the case here) to insider trading and market manipulation.

And none of that helps the PSE. For a start, it’s unlikely overseas investors will be stirred to put more money in the Philippine stock market right now, even though like everywhere else it could do with more foreign cash. Admittedly, the PSE – to put it crudely – is a domestic investors’ club and foreign investors have little exposure. In 2015, a whopping 98.5% of all investment – retail and institutional – came from local players. Just 1.5% came from overseas. Lopez’s actions certainly won’t improve that ratio. But then maybe she doesn’t want to as we shall see a little later.

But there could be a far bigger bill to pay for Lopez’s extraordinary mine-closures announcement. As The Volatilian™ stated – Minefield for investors [8 February] – “… this could end up being one of the most costly pieces of ‘green policy’ ever attempted as aftershocks threaten to reverberate across the entire Philippine economy”. Hopefully now, following the swift move by Duterte and his Cabinet to staunch the bleeding, those dangers have now been minimised.

The stock market aside, overseas-investors’ perceptions matter. You know – the country’s image as a fair place to put your money; as a place that runs on the rule of law; a place where government doesn’t influence the outcome of transactions. Transparency, governance, all that stuff. Actually, all the stuff this administration has been working hard  to promote.

But there is likely to be concern. If an individual department head can act independently and make a unilateral decision that affects an entire industry – without any reference to the wider economic ramifications – the stability of the system as a hole is seriously compromised. Furthermore, if it can happen in one government department, who’s to say it won’t happen in another?

Recently, The Volatilian™ met with Secretary of Trade and Industry, Ramon Lopez – no relation to Gina, we hasten to add – at the Board of Investments building in Makati. It was a good meeting and a very reassuring one. We were left in no doubt that this administration is free-market driven and that it’s doing all in its power to quickly establish the Philippines as place where foreign investors can safely put their money; where foreign firms can come and be a part of a growing economic landscape. Absolutely no doubt.

Lopez is an impressive man; he’s on top of his game and his department is a major cog in the wheel that’s driving the government’s bold socio-economic agenda. In short, R. Lopez knows which way is up; G. Lopez doesn’t seem to care.

But there might be other problems with DENR Lopez’s order – more specifically the data on which she based it.  Apparently, she involved anti-mining activists in helping to compile the audit. The question then is, just how reliable is the data? Really, how likely is it that their input was unprejudiced? Certainly it needs to be independently appraised; but if it’s found to be faulty or skewed in favour of the closures, then the government has a bigger problem. In short, that would amount to gross manipulation of the industry and Lopez’s position would be untenable.

She also hired former Mines and Geosciences Bureau chief, Leo Jasareno, under whose watch environmental violations went unchecked. He was DENR Senior Undersecretary for Environment in the former Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino administration, whom Duterte had told to “vacate” his position.

But this is a Lopez policy rather than a government policy and the Cabinet are never going to sign off on it. Other than her ‘green dream’ and hitting the mining bosses hard, Lopez seems to have taken account of little else. The workers who could lose their jobs – the little guys again – weren’t even mentioned when she made her announcement. What were they, acceptable collateral damage so we could get a few more butterflies?

The well-run Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) will undoubtedly step into the breach and take care of their immediate needs. But the fact is, if this goes ahead the mine workers have no work. They’re unemployed. They’re demoralised. But Lopez now has a solution for that. She says the government will spend PHP8 billion to create “blue lagoons and enchanted rivers” in ecology zones which will hire the jobless miners. In the meantime, maybe she could help them out with yoga. Which planet are we on right now? Anybody?

There seems to be more to this than Lopez’s hate of mining, though, as this very telling remark from her shows: “… the fact is, mining money funds political campaigns. You know that. But I know that when you are funded by whoever [sic], then you are indebted to that person. And so what happens is the decisions those people make are, by and large, always in favor of the people who funded their campaign”.

First of all that’s a very rich statement coming from someone who was born with a silver spoon –from where we’re sitting it sounds like someone suffering from pathological guilt – but it shows that her mine-closure decree was not solely based on environmental grounds. It was also based on her perception of how the mine owners spend there money and her resentment of them.

Some of them may well contribute to political campaigns – but that’s not an offence. And why single out miners. Does she think players in, for example, the telecommunications industry don’t contribute to political campaigns? How do we deal with them, shut down the country’s telecommunications? This is beyond naïve; this is bordering on vindictiveness. And that is not a quality anyone wants to see in a government minister.

Then there’s the US$22 billion of mining investment. What happens to that? How can that be used in the mining industry if there is no mining industry? Does any of this make any sense to anyone other that Gina Lopez?

Everything basically is now left on hold until the government can untangle this mess. And while the pit workers are wondering if at the end of it they’ll be able to put rice on the table for their families, Gina Lopez no doubt will be spending the time in Ánanda Márga meditation – or as we would say, fiddling while someone else is trying to stop Rome burning.

86 Comments

  • Did you guy see what a disaster may happen to those community within the mining site. Look at what happen in Brazil. You want that to happen in PH. Ito lang tanong ratio n proportion lang po. Ilan ang nakikinabang sa Minahan. Compare mo sa mga community na apektado ng winasak na kalikasan, sa kanilang ikinabubuhay at sa kanilang kalusugan. Yung iba kasi laway lang ang puhunan, Milyon milyon ang nakukura sa minahan.

    • Good day brod – tutal ikaw nagbanggit ng ratio and proportion, may bilang ka ba ng mga beneficiaries ng mga mining companies vs naapektuhan kung meron man? Then yung sweeping statement mo na owner lang ang kumikita, somehow may point ka brod but it is but natural for them to earn profit for they’ve also invested a lot. But again you are not considering the generation of employment fo the host community. Sa mga dating walang work na mga tao at biglang nagkaroon ng regular income make them capable of buying things that they can’t imagine having before plus some other things like even sending their kids to school. Don’t you think its an earning to them also? Then siguro pwede mo ako ma-convince sa claim mo if you can provide an actual clear sample of statistics showing the number in a community that are badly affected (hope not just a myth) vs those that are benefitting from it. Just an opinion lang.

  • Sec. Gina Lopez exposed a great deal of these Mining companies violations that majority of the Filipino people did not know about because not anyone in the media will bring them to light for fear of the political clout of these capitalists. Yes, they generated jobs to the local folks, but at what expense?…they killed the environment instead of taking good care of it. There is this thing called responsible mining, but it digs into the profits of these companies. How about the local folks in those places who didn’t get employed by these companies?…their livelihood depends on a healthy environment.Their health depends on an unpolluted environment.The polluted air and seawater goes to the rest of the islands, not localized to that mining area alone…think.

  • Those mines are clearly destroying our country for the sake of a few people. Digong recently approved the closure of the Surigao Mines (Suricon?). So “temporarily restrained”? It’s either we do it now or we don’t.

  • Terrible when big business can rape a country bare and get away with it. Surely they must be forced to pay for the damage they have done.After all the money these companies make and how little tax they pay.

  • miners who follow the law are okay but the majority have violated the law then what’s there to do than to close them. It’s scary to these people to lose their jobs but the wrath is of mother nature is more horrifying.

  • still didnt learn lesson from the past of what disaster marcoper has brought to the people of marinduque until now the people are suffering from the hazardous chemical that poison their streams and rivers

    • Is this the same marcopper of the marcose? Malaki ang kinita ng lintang marcopper na yan, at malaki dn ang pinsalang iniwan nlng at sukat s kalikasan ng marinduque. Dapat habulin at pagbayarin yan. Salot s bayan

  • Itigil na yang pagmimina pahamak lang yan sa kalikasan. Mga grasyang pinagkaloob ng Dios dapat alagaan at pagyamanin, hindi yong mga gahaman sa salapi lang ang makikinabang. Sinuway nyo ang kautusan ng Dios. H’wag sirain ang kalikasan.!!!

  • Oh okay, you love the environment and you also love gadgets (How else can you post your comments here?). I propose a strictly regulated mining industry, regularly monitored and supervised regarding environmental concerns rather than a total mining ban. Lithium batteries don’t grow from trees.

    • Hmmm. The lithium battery is just an example. We mine gold and copper which are also used in the manufacture of the gadget components. Why only Filipinos? Such tribalism tells you that it is okay for the Brazilians to destroy the Amazon rain forest and it is not our concern. We live in a world where we are connected. What if the oil producing countries suddenly stopped production because of environmental concerns, will the Filipinos be ready to go back to horse drawn carriages?

  • Kung susumahin ang buti at pinsala ng gmimina, mas d hamak n malaki ang pinsalang dulot ng pagabusong ito sa klikasan. Minsan lng minahin ang kabundukan sira na ito. Unang una puputlin ang mga puno gang mkalbo, papatagin at huhukayn ang lupa gang mtabunan ang mga ilog at sapa at ktubigan, tas itatapon ang basura ngminahan s ilog gang dagat na ikakamatay ng lahat ng may buhay s ktubigan, yan ang bunga ng pgmimina ng mga masiba at swapang n mga minahan. Kaya tama lng n ipasara na ang ma ito lalo n ung pagaari ng mga bwayang pulitiko.

  • mr. president, huwag kang mag papauto sa ibang cabinet members mo, may mga conect yan sa mga may ari ng mining co.s, kayang mag lobby ng mga iyan. WALA KA NANG MAKUKUHANG KASING SINCERE NIYANG SI GINA LOPES. MALILIIT NA MAMAMAYANG PILIPINO MUNA, BAGO ANG MALALAKING MINING CO.S

  • Kung pagmamasdan ang lawak ng pinsala sa pagmimina ano ang natitirang kinabukasan ng mga nakatira sa lugar ng minahan. Pagkatapos ng kontrata sa pagmimina sa kawalan din ng trabaho mauuwi ang mga lokal na mamamayan may bonus pang sakit at pinsala sa buong lugar ng pinagminahan. Sa kabilang banda nasa magagarang aircotioned na opisina at bahay ang mga nagpasasa at nakinabang sa likas yaman at naghihintay naman ngbisang malaking delubyo ang buong mamayan. Panibagong malalakas na pagbaha at pagkalason ng ilog at karagatan na pinagkukunan ng kabuhayan ng ibang mamamayan.

  • Volatilian huli ka na as balita. The suspensions and stoppage still stand. Do not support the elite and big mining business. Do not believe the lies that the industry peddles. The industry contributes less than 1% to GDP yet majority of the mining industry is irresponsible. Never mind the effects on the stock market.. It will recover in some other industry or economic areas. Think of communities who are affected by the environmental degradation. Be pro-poor instead of being pro- greedy and exploitative business. These companies have profited for so long, yet surrounding communities remain poor. So where is your conscience and heart? Still with the greedy business. Go to the Caraga region. You will also get mad at these companies. Have you heard of Marcopper? Rapu rapu incident? The Philex mining spill over in Benguet? The mining workforce can shift to other livelihood

  • Am with you on this Romy. The mining industry had been more of a bane than a boom. I had been to mining towns not only in our country and its the same. Those that toil remains impoverished. And its not only the human cost its also the environmental degradation. Problem is their influence is vast and far reaching (read MONEY) Already there are moves in tongress sad but true classmate..

  • Well, just when someone with “balls” can stand up against big mining firms who continue to operate multi billion peso business at the expense of the children of this nation. And just when a President is ready to go bust to protect the future haist

  • THE WAY WE RESPOND TO THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT IS DIRECTLY REFLECTS THE WAY WE TREAT HUMAN BEINGS. THE WILLINGNESS TO EXPLOIT THE ENVIRONMENT IS REVEALED IN THE WILLINGNESS TO PERMIT AVOIDABLE HUMAN SUFFERING. SO THE SURVIVAL OF THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT IS ALSO THE SURVIVAL OF OURSELVES.

  • After masalaula mga kabundukan naten at wala ng makuhang Mina sigurado iiwanan wasak at madaming fin mawawalan ng Trabaho,tama ka Sec.Gina,hanggat Hindi pa huli ang Lahat isarado na mga Minahan sa buong Bansa,good job Mam.

    • Mr Richie Oquendo – We will be doing a grave disservice if we refuse to call out irregularities, as we see them. To better understand where we are coming from, may I call your attention again to this part of the article: However, in making her announcement, she had failed first to directly inform the gazetted companies that the mining bans were now in effect. No formal notice was issued by the DENR. Consequently, mine owners and operators didn’t know whether they’d been closed or suspended or in fact anything else about Lopez’s decree. And up until yesterday – a full 10 days after the announcement – the Chamber of Mines of the Philippines says its members still haven’t received any order from the DENR.

      They weren’t the only ones baffled, however. The PSE was also left in the dark. As global nickel prices shot north by around 8% – and prices for mining stocks on the exchange fled sharply in the opposite direction – they couldn’t cross-check with the mining companies listed on the bourse to decide whether to suspend trading or continue. In the end, the listed mining firms asked the PSE for a voluntary halt to trading in their shares; but of course by then the horse had already bolted.

      But Lopez’s announcement was beyond irregular; it was grossly irresponsible. This was restricted government information which Lopez made available to members of the public even before the mining companies had been officially informed. In other words, this could have been used as insider information and could have been acted on – and for all we know it was – to make a quick killing; loading up on borrowed stock and shorting it, for example. Holders of mining stock could also have been alerted, allowing them to offload before the price dropped further. As a friend pointed out, “if a government official did that in Hong Kong, he’d be hanged, drawn and quartered”.

      Also, because of the way the PSE operates, the Philippine regulator isn’t able to determine whether there’ve been short sells – they can’t capture them. Also, while on other bourses short selling can only take place on an uptick in the share price, on the PSE, because there’s no way of knowing if they took place, it seems they can happen on a down tick. That said, we’re sure that the Securities and Exchange Commission will be looking for trading irregularities concerning mining shares around the time of the announcement.

      The point in all this is that anything put out by the government – or in this case, one of its ministers – can have a direct impact on the trading value of shares. That’s something that governments everywhere – banana republics excluded – take pains to avoid. It leaves them open to all sorts of charges, from naïveté (which we’d like to believe is the case here) to insider trading and market manipulation.

      And none of that helps the PSE. For a start, it’s unlikely overseas investors will be stirred to put more money in the Philippine stock market right now, even though like everywhere else it could do with more foreign cash. Admittedly, the PSE – to put it crudely – is a domestic investors’ club and foreign investors have little exposure. In 2015, a whopping 98.5% of all investment – retail and institutional – came from local players. Just 1.5% came from overseas. Lopez’s actions certainly won’t improve that ratio. But then maybe she doesn’t want to as we shall see a little later.

    • Pedro Santos Panadero Jr. – There’s no need for cussing. We can have a conversation without insults. We are not the oligarchs, neither are we a PR agency for an oligarch or a sector. On a personal note, I get the frustrations and even the anger Filipinos feel towards the mining sector. Tama po na being the number 1 nickel producer was not enough kung hindi naman karamay sa ginhawa ang mga kababayan natin at kung nasisira ang mga watershed at kabundukan. But in cleaning up any sector, due process must be followed, including informing the affected companies AND the Philippine Stock Exchange that the ban in now is effect. Ulitin ko po, due process and proper and timely disclosure.

  • Why restrained? Shall we let mining irreparably destroy our environment just to please and accomodate a few? Mining is not the main source of income for the Philippines. Agriculture is the best alternative and option. Close the mines and let’s go Agri! Go go go Sec. Gina Lopez!

  • Gina Lopez has the support of many because she has exposed mining companies that have been destroying the environment with impunity. Video clips of widespread destruction are being aired to show the reckless practice of companies which are only interested in plundering the environment. If the intervention of Secretary Gina Lopez is unjustified, the affected companies should refute her allegations. The people have the right to know the actual situation in mining sites and surrounding areas. But based televised reports, the damage sustained may take many generations to repair.

  • I think Volatilian and its writers should declare if they have any connection or investment in the mining industry. I have always liked your articles but when it comes to mining they appear highly personal.

    • Mr Graham Godfrey – I am one of the directors of The Volatilian and I can categorically state that I have no connection to any mining company, neither do I have any shares in any mining organisation or related institutions. The rest of our directors can be contacted via info@thevolatilian.com

    • For their individual statements: disclosures. We are not here to just write “positive” or pro-administration analysis. If we believe we should call out a government official’s actions or policies, we have to do so objectively and analytically.

    • It’s hard not to be connected to any mining company or people with interests in mining these days… most successful investors/businessmen are connected with mining. So unless you only tap on the unsuccessful ones I think its safe to assume we are all affected by the business of mining. What I don’t understand is the personal and condescending tone of the article. Is it needed to present the ineffectiveness of Gina Lopez?

    • Okay na sana yong article nung binasa ko ang first half, pero nung bandang huli na, they also committed the same thing they’re questioning about the audit sources, na prejudiced daw. Yong bandang last paragraphs na kasi eh claims ng writer na walang provided credible souces. Tsaka paki proofread na rin kasi may nabasa akong there instead na their saka first time ko ata maka-basa ng publically.

  • Merong nagcomment , na kung walang pang araro paano mabubungkal ang lupa para taniman . Yun daw kasing bakal na pang araro ay galing sa pagmimina. Para bang sinabi nya na kung wala akong car di KO kayang pumunta from point A to B . haayyy nakuuu , ! ! !

  • Sec. Gina Lopez the LP’s Standard Bearer as President of the Republic of the Philippines in 2022. Gina Lopez is Plan C if ever Vice-president Leni Robredo which is Plan B fails to replace Duterte as President. Bakit nga ba hindi. Is it not obvious Gina Lopez is member of the Lopez family who owns ABS-CBN that is the number one critic of the president. Nakikinig ba kayo sa mga komentaryo ng DZMM ako paminsan-minsan napapakinig, hindi nga lang ako makatagal kasi para akong aatakihin sa puso sa mga pinagsasabi ng mga putang-ina. Gina Lopez has to be required to sell all the shares, all her stake on the Lorez Group that is very much against Duterte if truly she is no longer serving the interest of her family. Siyempre dapat ibenta nya yon sa taong hindi nya na mabibili uli pag-inilabas nya tunay nyang kulay. As always and forever ‘BLOOD IS THICKER THAN WATER’. But there are those who choose country over family like Fidel Castro. Who after the Cuban Revolution did not spare the family land because Fidel Castro’s Family is Hacienderos in Cuba. The father of Fidel Castro said that he paid for his son’s education to be a lawyer to protect their land instead Fidel cease it and gave it away. If Gina Lopez will be in the place of Fidel Castro I doubt if she’ll do the same. Was Gina Lopez strategically placed there? The movie Godfather II has this famous line ‘keep your friends close and your enemies closer’. Gina Lopez is closing dozens of mine sites which makes me nervous because it’s like déjà vu. Did anyone know how the Lopez Family acquired MERALCO. It was owned by ‘General Public Utilities’, an American Company which the Lopez Family demonized through their media ABS-CBN and when its stock hit rock bottom they bought MERALCO from that American company. Have you notice what is happening now, what Gina Lopez is doing, she is demonizing mining and when stock fell rock bottom her family the Lopez Group will buy it just like what it did to MERALCO more than half a century ago. What Gina Lopez is doing is not for the environment it is business strategies to own if possible monopolize the entire mining industry. Haven’t you notice she closes the mine not making public what violations those mines commit. What she is doing is economic sabotage; mining is a major industry in the Philippines. If you want to discredit Duterte hit the mining industries which will results to economic crisis that will make Duterte look incompetent. Is the closing of those mines plan to do 2 things: one is for its stocks to hit rock bottom in order to be acquired by the Lopez Group cheap and the 2nd to sabotage the economy to make Duterte look incompetent of which ABS-CBN is openly and shamelessly doing. What is next close all the coal power plant because the Lopez Group power plants are Geothermal which are built by Marcos and after Marcos was overthrown the Lopez Group bought those same Geothermal Power Plants. After they close the coal power plants the Lopez Group will buy those same coal power plants and at the end will monopolize even the Power Plant Industry and place a Lopez in Malacanang in the person of Gina Lopez. Just imagine what plan can be more perfect than that. PUTANG-INANG BUHAY TO. GRABE ITONG DALAWANG PAMILYA NATO MGA LOPEZ AT COJUANGCO ang tindi ng kapit sa kapangyarihan. Yang dalawang pamilya nayan ang patunay na may sumpa Pilipinas kasi sinasamba natin mga manika at estatwa napansin nyo pati si Pres. Duterte nabubula. Hanggat hindi tayo titigil sa pagsamba sa poong Nazareno, sa Lady of Manoaog, sa Sto Nino ng Cebu nayan patuloy na gagamitin ng Diyos ang 2 pamilya nato para patuloy tayong maghirap.



  • hindi kasi tulad ng mga nakaraang admin na kitang kita na mga violation hindi pa din ipasara kasi puro sila stockholder ng mga mining firm. we support sec Gina Lopez!! #changehascome

  • Mas maayos na yun ganyan yun DENR SEC. ay nagtatrabaho at ginagawa ang lahat compare sa ibang nagdaan na SEC masuhulan lang ng pera wala na!

    Tsaka Tang ina Mo, Prospero Pichay!!

  • Mr. Jaime Domingo’s comment is worth pondering. Thank you sir for that info. “Is she or not” is worth the interest. One certain thing I want to see though is…what’s really the score in the mining industry with regards to the environmental issues, secondly…sino ba talaga ang nakikinabang, economic wise?

  • Hindi natin puwedeng isisi ang lahat ng pagkasira ng kalikasan dulot ng abusong pagmimina. May dapat ding pananagutan ang gobyerno dahil sa kinang nh salapi ay nagpabaya o nagtakip ng mata kahit amg kalikasan ay tuluyan ng sinisira. Ang mga may ari nh minahan ay sadyang mapagsamantala kaya nga yumaman sila ng todo todo mula sa rekurso hanggang sa mga empleyado na pinahsamantalahan nito.